Ancient Skeleton Discovered on Antikythera Shipwreck

PHOTO BY BRETT SEYMOUR

PHOTO BY BRETT SEYMOUR

WOODS HOLE – An international research team discovered a human skeleton during its ongoing excavation of the famous Antikythera Shipwreck (circa 65 B.C.).

The shipwreck, which holds the remains of a Greek trading or cargo ship, is located off the Greek island of Antikythera in the Aegean Sea.

The first skeleton recovered from the wreck site during the era of DNA analysis, this find could provide insight into the lives of people who lived 2100 years ago.

Led by archaeologists and technical experts from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the team excavated and recovered a human skull including a jaw and teeth, long bones of the arms and legs, ribs, and other remains.

Other portions of the skeleton are still embedded in the seafloor, awaiting excavation during the next phase of operations.

The Antikythera Shipwreck is the largest ancient shipwreck ever discovered.

It was discovered and salvaged in 1900 by Greek sponge divers.

In 1976, crews returned to the wreck and recovered nearly 300 more objects, including skeletal remains of the passengers and crew.

Several 3D models of the skeletal remains are available for researchers and the public to view on the Antikythera Project webpage.

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